Category: Reviews

Recent Readings

Pir Zia Inayat-Khan A collection of 5 short reviews of significant works, including Elemental Philosophy: Earth, Air, Fire, and Water as Environmental Ideas by David Macauley, The Crucifixion and the Qur’an: A Study in the History of Muslim Thought by Todd Lawson, Morals and Mysticism in Persian Sufism: A history of Sufi-futuwwat in Iran by…

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Gone to Earth and Sufism

Pir Zia Inayat-Khan In her richly imagined biography of Mary Webb, Gladys Mary Coles notes the similarity of Webb’s mystical love to that of the Sufi poets. To compare Webb’s rapturous animism with the God-centered esotericism of the Sufi tradition might at first seem incongruous, but I think that Dr. Coles’ perception of a resemblance…

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Untold: A History of the Wives of Prophet Muhammad: Demystifying Islam’s First Women

Dr. Susan Corso The Prophet Muhammad didn’t start out as a prophet; neither was Jesus the Christ from day one. These divinely inspired men became what they were meant to be. And right alongside both, there were women. Untold: A History of the Wives of Prophet Muhammad is a mystical demystification of the women who…

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Arrow to the Soul

Dr. Edward Tick Peter Kingsley’s work is so unique, urgent, demanding and liberating, that I find it difficult to conjure the best metaphors for who he is and what gifts he brings us. I think of him as a renegade philosopher preaching in the marketplace rather than teaching in academia, an alchemist, a poet of…

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The Great Bay: Chronicles of the Collapse

Gyrus I can’t say where The Great Bay: Chronicles of the Collapse, an ambitious new novel by poet and psychoactive plant pioneer Dale Pendell, fits into the apocalyptic literary landscape, but it certainly demands the attention of anyone concerned with how we imagine the future, and how these visions affect the present. I’ve not read, or even…

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New Light on the Art of Islam

The Challenge of Islam: The Prophetic Tradition—Lectures, 1981 by Norman O. BrownH. Talat Halmanhttp://www.sevenpillarshouse.org/assets/images/content/challenge-of-islam.jpg The Challenge of Islam is a recent posthumously-published set of seven transcribed lectures originally delivered at Tufts in 1981, and one essay written as a conference paper. In it, Norman O. Brown (1913-2002) poses three vital and interconnected challenges. Norman O….

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Red Book

by Carl Gustav Jung, edited by Sonu Shamdasani, W.W. Norton & Co, New York, 2009Janet Piedilato Red Book, the dream journal of the great Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, was published in the fall of 2009. It sold out before publication, and is already in its fifth edition. While many knew of its existence through references…

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When Technology Displaces CultureWilliam Irwin Thompson When printed manuscripts were first introduced, they appeared as incunabula and were made to look like medieval hand-illuminated vellum rather than printed paper. When new Victorian hand guns were introduced, they were covered with vines and made to look more like a plant than a weapon. When printed manuscripts…

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The Avatar Film & the Trees’ ReBirthDay

Celebrating Forest and the Lungs of EarthArthur Waskow Several milestones in my life came this past week as I continue climbing into and beyond my post-car-crash ordeal of the last four months. One came Sunday afternoon, when Phyllis and I saw our first movie-movie (in a movie house, not DVD) since August. The film was…

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Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer

Dr. Andrew Weil It is a rare human act that is utterly reprehensible. Some glimmer of grace, some hope for redemption shines through nearly all of our efforts. And then, Jonathan Safran Foer reminds us in his new book, Eating Animals there is factory farming of living creatures.   It is a rare human act…

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